Doing Business in Mexico, English

Doing Business in Mexico: A Guide

24 Aug , 2020  

Invest in Mexico, Doing Business in Mexico 2020, Mexican Law Firm, Guide, Foreign Investment Guide, Doing Business Ranking

In line with our objectives, VTZ Law Firm has developed a Doing Business in Mexico Guide with a strong focus on foreign investment in manufacturing activities. It is our goal as trusted advisors and business facilitators to guide foreign investors, providing insights in a concise manner.

Why Doing Business in Mexico?

Before the coronavirus outbreak, economists predicted that Mexico was heading to be the seventh economy of the world in 2050.[1] Mexico would be growing at a 3.5% annual average rate over the next three decades, a growth rate superior to that of developed economies. Mexico’s size of the economy, demographic, sound macroeconomics, stable public finances, as well as recent amendments to strategic economic sectors have contributed to a better economic performance according to the OECD.[2]

Today, Mexico is one of the most attractive foreign investment destinations. Besides being the 15th largest economy in the world, Mexico is a “free market” economy that is opened to international trade and foreign investment. As a result, Mexico has a highly diversified economy, modern industries, and a developed financial market. This is the result of a shift from protectionist towards liberal economic policies since the beginning of the 1990s, particularly, with the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Susana Muñoz and Karla Loyo, members of our Chinese Desk, wrote the following summary for Doing Business Mexico.

The Economy and Free Trade Agreements

Needless to say, there is still much work to be done to improve the general conditions of life for Mexicans, as well as for the business environment. For instance, the World Economic Forum identifies Mexico’s five most problematic factors for business: corruption, crime and theft, inefficient government bureaucracy, tax rates, and tax regulations.     However, there is hope. In recent years, business facilitation measures have been in the political agenda as well as tackling corruption, which is now more relevant than ever as a result of Mexico’s modern free trade agreements (FTAs). In fact, it is clear that Mexico’s competitiveness relies on its extensive FTAs network as a pivotal force for its economic development.

Therefore, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which entered into force in July 2020, will continue to consolidate the country as an attractive business destination as long as Mexico successfully implements said agreement.

¿What happen with the Mexican Promotion Investment Agency (PROMEXICO)?

Mexico is living a historic moment. The political map changed significantly following the general elections held in July 2018. Mexico’s president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO), and his party, the National Regeneration Movement (Morena), have continued the trend to promote, for instance, free trade agreements, but they have also adopted new and controversial policies. For instance, Mexico’s investment and trade promotion agency, PROMEXICO, was extinguished as result of “austerity” measures.

Vázquez Tercero & Zepeda (VTZ) seeks to fill that void and promote Mexico as a business destination for international companies and foreign investors in an honest and concise manner. This is why VTZ has developed Doing Business in Mexico 2020, which is divided into seven chapters:

1. Why Invest in Mexico?

2. Foreign Investment

3. International Trade Policy

4. Trade Policy for the Manufacturing Industry

5. Creating a Company in Mexico

6. Taxation in Mexico

7. Labor & Migration

In these executive guides, VTZ aims to help and to provide insights regarding relevant legal topics on business, trade, tax, and labor for potential investors, that seek to reap the best out of Mexico and the manufacturing industry.

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[1] PWC, The World in 2050, 2017 p 6.

[2] OECD, Towards a Stronger and More Inclusive Mexico, p 1

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Doing Business in Mexico, English

Why Invest in Mexico?

24 Aug , 2020  

Invest in Mexico, Doing Business in Mexico 2020, Mexican Law Firm, Guide, Foreign Investment Guide, Doing Business Ranking

Our first chapter of Doing Business in Mexico, Why Invest in Mexico?, will serve as an introduction providing a general overview of the current economic and business environment.

VTZ Law Firm analyzes Mexico’s doing business rankings and economic indicators –positive and negative– from the World Bank and the World Economic Forum.

Also, we summarize trade and foreign direct investment statistics with a strong focus on the manufacturing industry, land in Mexico for industrial purposes, and security considerations.

  1. Mexico in Competitiveness Rankings
    1. 1 Positive Economic and Business Indicators in 2019
    1. 2 Negative Economic and Business Indicators in 2019
  2. Trade and Investment in the Manufacturing Sector
  3. Land in Mexico for Industrial and/or Manufacturing purposes
  4. Security Considerations
  5. Mexico in Brief

1. Mexico in Competitiveness Rankings

Although Mexico is not one of the most competitive countries in the world, Mexico is the second Latin American most competitive economy according to the World Economic Forum (WEF) and the World Bank (WB). WEF’s Global Competitiveness Index 2019, a yardstick for policymakers, analyzes 12 “broad” pillars that shape an economy of a country. Meanwhile, the WB’s Doing Business gathers information regarding the regulatory environment and how it impacts in local firms, reporting 10 key indicators.

Doing Business in Mexico World Bank ranking 2019, how to do business in Mexico, mexican lawyer

1.1 Positive Economic and Business Indicators in 2019

WEF’s Global Competitiveness Index 2019

Mexico stands out in macroeconomic stability (41st) and market size (11th) pillars, which are very relevant indicators to invest or do business in Mexico. This is no surprise as Mexico’s inflation has been controlled, around 3% to 4% per year; its GDP has had a stable growth, about 3%, in the last decades; and, its public debt has been properly managed.

Needless to say, inflation has had few spikes, notably in 2017, as a result of the liberalization of energy goods; and, despite having the second largest market of Latin America (124 million people), Mexico has a low GDP per capita or purchasing power.  

Furthermore, Mexico also stands out in the following specific indicators: budget transparency (6th), energy efficiency regulation (30th), renewable energy regulation (30th), road connectivity (22nd), airport connectivity (15th), liner shipping connectivity (34th), electricity access (% of population) (2nd), debt dynamics (36), trade openness (27), ease of hiring foreign labor (48),  financial stability (30), cluster development (36), among others.

WB’s Doing Business 2020

Mexico is ranked in 60th place overall, out of 190 economies, and is one of the top business-friendly environments in Latin America, only behind Chile that ranks in the 59th position. Mexico’s top three topics or indicators are getting credit (11th), resolving insolvency (33), and contract enforcement (43rd).

As a result of strong legal rights in relation to collateral laws (securities) as well as a robust credit reporting system, Mexico outperforms most economies in getting credit. Mexico also has a decent performance in the resolving insolvency and contract enforcement indicators, particularly, due to time to carry out a dispute in a court (under certain assumptions) and strength of insolvency framework index. 

1.2 Negative Economic and Business Indicators in 2019

WEF’s Global Competitiveness Index 2019

Unsurprisingly, Mexico underperforms in the Institution and Labor Market pillars of the WEF’s Global Competitiveness Index 2019. Although serious legislative steps have been made on security, corruption, and “regulatory improvement”, Mexico continues to rank particularly low in a handful of matters that fall under the Institution pillar such as security (138th), burden of government regulation (116th), judicial efficiency (116th), judicial independence (103rd), as well as incidence to corruption (116th). 

Insecurity is a concern not only for foreign investors. We note that the new administration has pushed for constitutional and legal reforms that have overhauled security bodies, the attorney general’s office, and powers to the Tax Authority (SAT, acronym in Spanish) against tax evasion schemes. The Financial Intelligence Unit (UIF, acronym in Spanish) has been tackling high profile individuals and companies that are allegedly involved in laundering money or in corrupt practices.  

As for the Labor Market pillar, Mexico underperforms in redundancy costs (e.g. severance of labor contracts) (103rd), as well as labour tax rates (116). Needless to say, Mexican Labor Law has undergone a significant overhaul as a result of USMCA’s Labor Chapter, which seeks to protect collective labor rights. However, neither redundancy costs nor labor tax rates (i.e. a state tax) were addressed in such reform.   

WB’s Doing Business 2020

Known to have a complicated tax environment, Mexico is ranked in the 120th position out of 190 economies in the Paying Taxes topic of WB’s Doing Business 2020. Under normal circumstances, a company would have to pay six taxes throughout the year, namely corporate income tax, value-added tax, security social contributions, payroll tax, property tax*, and vehicle tax*.

Despite a low number of tax payments as compared to other jurisdictions, Mexico’s tax environment is poorly ranked especially due to (1) total tax and contribution rate and (2) the post-filing index. For instance, Mexico’s statutory tax rates for the corporate income and VAT, which are the most time consuming and prone to tax audits, are set at 30% and 16% respectively. Furthermore, VAT refunds or income tax corrections take a considerable amount of time and effort.

Mexico’s also underperforms in Starting a Business (107th). Though starting a business is discussed in the ChapterCreating a Company in Mexico, the process to incorporate a company appears, in its face, straightforward in Mexico. According to the guide, a non-foreign entrepreneur has to complete eight procedures to incorporate a company and to have all registrations in order; however, a significant practical hurdle is that concerning to the company’s registration before SAT.

Likewise, the number of procedures and time are factors that negatively affect Mexico’s score in Getting Electricity (106th), meanwhile the number of procedures, cost, among other matters, influence Mexico’s negative performance in Registering Property (105th).

2. Trade and Investment in the Manufacturing Sector

Mexico’s foreign direct investment (FDI) and international trade are, to a great extent, attributable to the established manufacturing sector, which convinces foreign investors to invest in Mexico. According to UNCTAD’s World Investment Report 2020, Mexico is the 14th  country with most FDI inflows in the world in 2019. In sum, Mexico is a top FDI destination.

UNCTAD, FDI, Top FDI Inflows, Top 20 host economies, 2018 and 2019
Source: UNCTAD

As noted by the WEF, Mexico has a strong cluster development. This feature explains why almost half of Mexico’s FDI inflows are related to the manufacturing sector.

Investment Inflows in the Mexican Manufacturing Sector

The top five manufacturing sub-sectors that have attracted investment from 1999 to 2019 are (1) transport equipment (e.g. auto), (2) beverages and tobacco, (3) chemical, (4) computer, communication, and measurement equipment, and (5) the food industry

For instance, FDI in the transport equipment (or auto sector) has amounted to 79,053 million USD since 1999, which represents 21% of Mexico’s total foreign direct investment inflows as noted in the table below:  

Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico 2020, Mexico, Manufacturing

Mexico has different levels of industrialization. In fact, most of the manufacturing sector has established itself in the north and the center of the country. For instance, the (passenger) auto industry and the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturers) are located in the States as indicated in the image below.

OEMs in Mexico, Promexico, Auto Industry in Mexico, Foreign Investment, International Trade, Foreign Investment

International Trade and Manufactured Goods

Establishing itself as an important manufacturing hub, Mexico is an economy with a significant presence in international trade. Mexico ranks in 12th place among world economies in both exports and imports, its trade balance amounts to 916 billion USD in 2019. The World Trade Organization describes Mexico as:

“a ‘buyer’ in GVCs and therefore has a significant rate of GVC backward participation, standing at 36 percent in 2015. The economy imports inputs mostly from the United States and China to produce its exports.”[1]

Mexico’s main exports include (1) manufactured goods, (2) fuels and mining products, (3) agricultural products that amount a total of 461 billion USD.

Trade Balance, Mexico, Exports, Manufactured goods

Mexico’s Export Destination in 2019

Mexico Exports, Trade Balance, International Trade, 2019,

In 2019, Mexico exported 461 billion USD. Unsurprisingly, Mexico’s main export destination is USA exports amounting to $371 billion USD, followed by the European Union $24 billion USD, Canada $14 billion USD, and China $7 billion USD%.

Mexico’s Origin of Imports in 2019

Mexico Imports, Trade Balance, International Trade, 2019,

As for import data, US imports amount to 205.733 billion USD, China 83.052 billion USD, European Union imports amount to 51.237 billion USD, Japan 17.963 billion USD, and Korea 17.649 billion USD

Comparing the US-China trade relations, US exports more goods in value to Mexico than to China. For instance, US exports to China amounted to $106 billion in 2019. 

Land in Mexico for Industrial and/or Manufacturing purposes.

Land in Mexico may be purchased or leased for industrial purposes. Needless to say, Mexican law has restrictions as to the ownership of land when, for instance, it is located in the northern border strip or near the coastline (see our Foreign Investment Chapter)…..

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For more information about VTZ Law Firm services, visit our website or contact us info[@]vtz.mx!

Security Considerations: Does it Affect Decisions to Invest in Mexico?

Mexico limps from security-related matters that affect its competitiveness indicators significantly, which may affect decisions to invest in Mexico. We cannot turn a blind eye on this fact, and foreign investors normally pose the question:

How risky is Mexico?

The American Chamber of Commerce in Mexico (Amcham), which we are members, published…

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[1] World Trade Organization, World Trade Statistical Review 2019, pg. 43

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Doing Business in Mexico, English

Foreign Investment in Mexico: A Guide For Foreigners

24 Aug , 2020  

Foreign Investment in Mexico, Foreign Direct Investment, FDI, Mexican Lawyers, how to do business

Our second chapter of Doing Business in Mexico, Foreign Investment, will provide a general overview of the rules and restrictions on foreign capital in Mexico.

This chapter includes the following sections:

  1. Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico in Numbers
  2. General Context of Foreign Investment Law in Mexico
  3. Prohibited Economic Sectors
  4. Economic Sectors with Restrictions
  5. Foreign Investment Reviews in Mexico?
  6. Foreign Investment and Real Estate in Mexico
  7. International Investment Agreements
    1. Bilateral Investment Treaties
    2. Free Trade Agreements with Investment Chapters
    3. Mexico’s Investor-State Dispute History and Record
    4. Considering IIA when Investing in Mexico?
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1. Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico in Numbers

Mexico is an open economy that embraces foreign investment. According to foreign direct investment statistics from 1999-2020, almost half of Mexico’s FDI comes from the USA, followed by Spain, Canada, Japan, and Germany. 

For more information on FDI inflows per country, see Appendix 1- Table: Top FDI Inflows per Country.

Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico, Mexican Lawyers, Mexican Law Firm, VTZ,

Interestingly, China is a major exporting capital country in the world. In fact, Chinese investment in Latin America and the Caribbean has had a sharp increase in the last years. However, that has not been the case in Mexico. Chinese investment in Mexico only represents around 0.2% of the total investment in Mexico, according to official statistics of the Mexican Ministry of Economy.

As for economic sectors, FDI inflows have focused mainly on the manufacturing sector, followed by financial services, international trade, mining, construction, transportation, and hotel industry. For more information on FDI inflows per the economic sector, see Appendix 2- Table: Top FDI Inflows per Country.

Mexico, Foreign Direct Investment, FDI, Economic Sectors, Manufacturing Industry

In this chapter, VTZ will provide an overview of the foreign investment restrictions applicable to economic sectors and real estate, the role of the authorities regarding investment authorizations, and the Bilateral Investment Treaties. 

2. General Context of Foreign Investment Law in Mexico.

As a general rule, foreign investment is authorized without restrictions in the territory of Mexico, unless the Law expressly includes a limitation. In other words, Mexico does not have a special zone where foreign investment rules are more “flexible” as investment promotion policies because it has adopted a “negative list” approach that applies throughout its territory…Read More

3. Prohibited Economic Sectors.

From a practical standpoint of view, the Law expressly prohibits foreign investment in “ten” general economic sectors that are classified as “activities reserved to the Mexican State” or “activities reserved to Mexicans”…Read More 

4. Economic Sectors with Foreign Investment Restrictions

The Foreign Investment Law provides the following ownership interests limitations or caps to foreign investors in Mexican enterprises that may not be exceeded directly or indirectly in the following regulated activities:…Read More 

5. Foreign Investment Reviews?

Mexico has foreign investment reviews in place, but they differ from those carried out in other jurisdictions. United States, Canada, and China, for instance, have foreign investment reviews that are triggered by “national security” concerns. National security concerns… Read more

6. Foreign Investment and Real Estate

The transfer of real estate ownership is subject to several conditions, including where the property is located, the land regime, and the buyer’s legal nature and nationalityRead More 

7. International Investment Agreements

Mexico has a large network of International Investment Agreements, either in the form of a Bilateral Investment Treaty or as an Investment Chapter in a Free Trade Agreement.

An Individual or company, qualifying as an investor, and their “investment” in Mexico may benefit from international protection provided that he or she is from a State that is a party to an international investment agreement with Mexico and that the investment qualifies as such under the relevant agreement….Read More 

7.1 Bilateral Investment Treaties

7.2 Free Trade Agreements with Investment Chapters

7.3 Mexico’s Investor-State Dispute History and Record

7.4 Considering IIA when Investing in Mexico?

Thank you for your interest and for visiting our website, to continue reading please fill out the form below.

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English, News

Mexico and China & Habemus Tomato Agreement – The Trading Room

23 Aug , 2019  

China and Mexico, Investment and Trade, Tomato Suspension Agreement

The Trading Room

(Download our newsletter in PDF: Trading Room -20190823)

Mexico and China: Trade & Investment

In an interview, the Underminister of North American Affairs of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Jesus Seade, commented on China and its “trade war” with the USA.

According to the news outlet, Mr. Seade commented that Mexico has to become more attractive for Chinese investment and that Mexico must address its trade deficit with China.

Also, we note that Chinese investment in Mexico is insignificant in comparison to foreign direct investment from other countries, e.g. the US, Japan, Korea, etc.  However, Mr. Seade stressed that such situation must change and Mexico has “… to be [China’s] privileged partner in the western hemisphere, America, and Mexico has to do everything so that this can occur.”

Source:

https://elfinanciero.com.mx/economia/tenemos-que-ser-el-socio-privilegiado-de-china-seade

Habemus Tomato Agreement

 

This Wednesday, the US Department of Commerce announced a new draft agreement with Mexican tomato producers/exporters. The agreement will suspend the anti-dumping investigation and, therefore, it would avoid final antidumping duties on Mexican tomato.

 

Interested parties may comment on the draft suspension agreement during the next 30 days. In essence,  Mexican tomato producers/exporters agreed to respect reference prices and, according to the Washington Post, 66% of tomato imports will be subject to an inspection to verify the quality of the product.

 

Once the suspension agreement enters into force, the US will eliminate the provisional anti-dumping duty, imposed on May 7th, 2019, and the duties paid would be returned or refunded to the Mexican tomato producers/exporters.

Sources:

https://www.commerce.gov/news/press-releases/2019/08/us-department-commerce-announces-new-draft-suspension-agreement-fresh

https://elfinanciero.com.mx/economia/acuerdo-entre-tomateros-mexicanos-y-estados-unidos-un-paso-positivo-hacia-la-aprobacion-del-t-mec-economia

https://elfinanciero.com.mx/economia/guerra-del-jitomate-llega-a-su-fin-eu-y-tomateros-mexicanos-alcanzan-acuerdo-para-evitar-aranceles

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-08-21/u-s-mexico-reach-deal-to-suspend-tomato-dumping-probe-tariffs

https://expansion.mx/empresas/2019/08/22/los-productores-de-tomate-es-lo-mejor-que-pudimos-hacer-para-nuestro-pais

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/08/21/us-mexico-settle-tomato-squabble-stave-off-tariffs-shortage/

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-tomato-mexico/mexico-and-u-s-reach-deal-to-end-tomato-tariff-dispute-idUSKCN1VB0T5.

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